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of the working man's life. >> they seem to be doing that in some states. >> not allowing union bosses to compel them to write checks from their paychecks. where they don't belong. >> front page of all the papers. controversial right-to-work measures will soon be the law of the land in michigan. republican governor rick snider signed the law despite wide protests at the capitol. the law will make it illegal for a union employee to pay union dues as a condition of their employment. >> let's explain that. just for half a second. then we'll go on. right to work, what does it mean? people ask me, what does it mean? it means unions can force somebody to pay them if they want to get a job in the state of michigan. >> well, what it means is, if you get a job, the union extracts money from your paycheck for the dues for union dues. >> well, yeah. >> automatically. >> automatically. >> you've got no choice. oh, you want to work here? well, you've got to pay us. >> right. >> what if i don't want to pay you? what if i don't want to support the candidates you support? what if they're the antithesis of my va
protecting nonunion workers from being forced to pay union dues. welcome to "america live," everyone, i'm allison cam rat to in for megyn kelly today. the bill could be signed by the governor as early as tomorrow. pro-union protesters responding with shouts of "shame on you" from the gallery as huge crowds mass on the state capitol grounds. we understand police are ready with riot gear in case things turn ugly. thousands of union supporters have been at the statehouse since early today stomping their feet, chanting, as you can hear there, one union boss saying, quote: we're going to take you on and take you out. nearby an angry confrontation breaking out. union protesters apparently storming the tent of the local chapter of conservative group americans for prosperity, tearing it down and then going after some right-to of work supporters -- right-to-work supporters. let's watch this. in -- >> shut your mouth! shut your mouth, i wasn't talking to you! you put your hands on me, see what happens. shut up! shut your mouth. [bleep] >> hey, hey! >>> lien -- [bleep] >> you guys are knocking the
or not to join a union. until tonight you had to join a union. >> eric: more interesting to that is that they closed school districts in and around the detroit area because teachers decided to protest instead of teaching the kids. >> gretchen: that is insane. especially when you think of snow days coming. in fact minnesota had 18 inches of snow and protestors that they can make it out of minnesota to get to state of michigan. now the kids are going to suffer? it is a repercussion of this? >> eric: what are the teachers teaching the kids by not showing up to work and protesting a right to work legislation that is passed legally and no tricks done. they vote add for a republican governor who said he would do that and he did do that. >> steve: kids will learn how teachers get a day off. calling in sick. talking about taylor, michigan. so many teachers called in sick superintendents said we'll take tomorrow off, kids. see you back here on wednesday. the president of the united states was in michigan and he said right to work thing, sure you have heard the stories about good w
, screaming outside of your apartment. that's the sound a union is blasting outside an apartment complex to make a point, leaving residents at their wits' end, but is there anything they can do about it? kelly's court is on the case. >> i know everybody say they got the right, and that's fine. don't we have rights, too, that we have to hear this constantly every day? megyn: a fierce battle over water is about to be waged in federal court. several government organizations in virginia have sued the environmental protection agency over regulations they say are so strict that the epa is now dubbing water itself a pollutant that it can regulate. but there is more. there are concerns that complying with the epa's regulations could wind up forcing the government to regulate people's homes and what they can do to those homes. those homes could be in jeopardy, and the empty lots could then be reused by the feds in different ways. shannon bream is live in washington to explain. shannon? >> reporter: well, megyn, it almost sounds unbelievable, but these are the facts, and tomorrow a federal judge i
union membership and dues optional in the heart of the rust belt. cradle of the organized labor. they insist they are not breaking the labor union because it does not target collective bargaining. this weakens their foundation. >> you have people alongside of you that won't pay the union dues if you pay the union dues but will still be able to get the benefit from being union member. >> spokesman for democratic caucus says to anticipate legal challenge is understatement. democrats will target the language in the laws. given the bill through the lame duck session and noisy demonstrators out of the chambers the democrats say they will challenge under the open meetings laws. >> they lied to us every step of the way and they are acting like cowards. >> he says it's leadership. >> baloney. >> as demonstrators storm the capitol, police used pepper spray. additional state troopers sent to lansing today with anticipation that the demonstrations will peak on tuesday. >> we want to keep things safe. we will not have another wisconsin in michigan. people have a right to protest. but it wil
. hundreds of union workers and supporters are protesting a so-called right to work bill in michigan that threatens organized labor in the state. we're live in lansing. >>> a decorated combat veteran, a young man excited about joining the military, we're remembering the navy s.e.a.l. killed while trying to rescue a fellow everyone that afghanistan. >>> plus this. >> your roof just collapsed. >> it just collapsed. >> a family is cleaning up after their ceiling collapses following a severe storm and it's all caught on camera. we'll show you more of that dramatic video, plus guns and football, after the shooting death involving a kansas city linebacker some nfl players are turning in their firearms. "newsroom" starts right now. good morning, everybody. i'm ted rowlands in for carol costello today. lansing, michigan, is the target of a protest. the republicans are trying to push through a right to work bill that could severely hurt organized labor in the state. the governor promises to sign the bill as soon as it hits his desk which could be within hours. the new legislation bars requiri
to go into world war ii, when to speak with the union, and he said, look, we have realizes that if you're a does not sustain free enterprise, the united states cannot gain free enterprise itself. so if you're looking for a motive for this, that is really what it comes back to. >> is there something distinctive about the american state the positions it to do this? of the states occurred in the wind. >> you really have to understand this historically because if you ask the question of globalization being inevitable and you looked at the first half of 20th-century, it looked like it was impossible. you have empires that are fragmenting globalization. have two world wars. yet the oppression. in the question by the second world war is, is globalization at all possible? can you have a global capitol system? and it was only made possible because the american state had a specific capacity to take that on some specific capacities and the interest because you have to remember that after the first world war the u.s. was already a dominant economic power in the world by far. industrial power. alre
the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release
to pay a huge fine. a record penalty. but no arrests. why exactly is that? plus, union protesters versus lawmakers over a right-to-work bill that's now the law. >> show me what democracy looks like. >> this is what democracy looks like. >> when you bring a right-to-work issues to michigan, the home of labor unions, i think you are itching to pick a fight. [shouting] >> our troopers are prepared for any civil disorder. [chanting] >> our state, our home. >> shepard: it's an enormously controversial measure. >> this legislation isn't about anything except an attack on workers' rights. >> it shouldn't be a condition of employment that you have to join a union and have to pay dues. tonight, who wins and who loses and why it matters to the rest of us. plus, on a crowded sidewalk in manhattan, a gunman walked up to his victim and pulled the trigger. >> he got shot in the head and just so much blood. >> tonight the newly released surveillance video and developments in the manhunt for the midtown killer. >> but first from fox this busy tuesday night, an historic defeat for unions in the state con
into law making michigan the nation's 24th right it work state. now despite violent pro-union protests all day, governor snyder last night said these new laws will create more jobs. >> i don't view this as anti-union at all. i believe this is pro-worker. this is an opportunity for unions to step up to say how they can provide the best value to workers in our state and be really responsive and listen to them and hopefully get successful getting workers on board. jenna: many strong opinions about this. mike tobin in lansing, michigan with the latest. mike? >> reporter: a lot of sound, fury and big numbers are gone from the demonstrationsgan. if you look behind me the afl-cio with a silent protests. you see tape across their mouth. $1500 less that's what they believe on average workers will make here in michigan now that it has become a right-to-work state. this is sharp contrast what we saw yesterday, hundreds and hundreds of angry demonstrators on the capitol ground and capitol building itself. the democrats say this does in the mean the fight is over. a spokesman for the democratic party s
this concert. >> fantastic. >> i learned that the governor honestly believes he is helping unions with the right to work. they need a value proposition. >> now, now, now. he is not here to defend himself. >> what are did you learn? >> i learned about lindsay. the biggest challenge in and the most wonderful thing you can do. congratulations. if it's way too early, what time is it? >> it's time for chuck todd and "the daily rundown." >> as the fiscal cliff pressure goes on, whether john boehner has the votes to get a deal through. they have ads aimed at house republicans. one of boehner's colleagues is not exactly rejecting the idea of challenging him with a gavel. we will dig into that. overseas, north korea fires off another rocket. we will have the latest on what the pentagon and the world is saying about this closed off country's capability to launch a long range rweapon. plus 65 years of history making by our friends at "meet the press." the longest running television show. on the planet. from a deep dive also into the kennedy legacy and the man who laid the foundation for a wh
boomers 15 years away from retiring and i don't have the luxury of the soviet union falling. the recipes that worked in the late 1990's worked. they don't work now. we have a different set of problems. host: from new york city, democrat blind, go ahead. caller: thank you for taking my call. even if we go over the fiscal cliff, we need a bigger plan because it does not even balance the budget. i don't think we really have a supply-side problem. they talk about cutting taxes on the right and i think there are so many people out of work and i think you need to get these people to work. i just think we have a demand issue, not a supply issue. if you're out of work, you cannot pay taxes. guest: he is exactly right -- no one is talking about a fiscal cliff that will solve the problem. there is no grand bargain being discussed except in the most general outline terms. there is enough to be -- nothing close to being politically acceptable. we're only talking of something of that will allow people to get through this. in the short term, we need to have fiscal policy that may get the deficit highe
their monumental legislation stripping union rights in the state. with no warning and no debate after an election in which they did not say that was what they were going to do. that surprise attack legislation passed in such a breathless hurry there are now lawsuits in the state whether the bills were passed illegally, in contradiction of the state's sunshine laws. they're also trying to figure out whether the new union-stripping laws in michigan will apply to workers who work for the state government, or if they only killed the unions in the private sector. but the reason that governor snyder has been able to do all of this in such a hurry, the reason he was able to make the 180 he pulled on stripping union rights, for example, the reason he is able to purchase saul the anti-abortion and the anti-sharia law legislation is because he can, right? michigan republicans are moving full steam ahead with whatever they want. they've got control of both houses of the legislature. they've got the governorship. even after they come back next year for the next session, even after this election, which was no
, and said, how can it be the head of the soviet union dies, and we have no contingency plan. it was criminal, said the president. the truth was the united states and the other western nations had very little idea of what was happening behind the iron curtain. two years later at the first summit meeting of the cold war era at geneva in 1955, the united states still did not know who was running the soviet union. they sent four leaders, one tall white man in a white suit with a white goatee who looked like colonel sanders from kentucky fried chicken, clearly, a figure head. the head of the red army, ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower spent his son, john, to do some spying. subdued and shaken, just whispered, "things are not as they seem." presidentize -- president eisenhower found out who was in charge on the fifth day of the conference. the big pier of the nuclear age was a surprise attack. proposed each country allow the other country's reconnaissance plane to fly overhead to detect preparations for a sneak attack. the soviet delegation initially seemed to like the
in his state of the union? >> certainly a priority if the president wants to advance it. he has the biggest bully pulpit in the country. the president can convince half the country or more that he's right, but to stop anything from happening, the nra does not have to convince half the country. it has to mobilize its members in key districts and it's not artificially freezing anything, it's politically freezing something by mobilizing your people who they have who are single-issue voters who care a lot about this and agree with their executives and kind of officers about how -- about what is sensible and wrong in stopping gun violence. >> one argument is that mobilization, though, to your point, is very asimilymmetric. research in this area shows that you have right up in the shooting you have a spike of discussions of gun control. this was true after the assassination attempt of congresswoman giffords and after aurora, then in the following weeks, the discussion of the policy fades. and one of the political scientists involved in this calls it, of course, the issue attention cyc
, and it is supplied by the soviet union, it's intended to be delivered principally by soviet-style scud rockets. and, essentially, when you fire explode over the target, they set up a cloud, if you will, of deadly gas. and in the middle east iraq has used it twice, once against their own people and once against the iranians, and so there's a precedent, if you will, jon, for the use of deadly nerve agent in the middle east. the downside for the syrians, of course, is that the worst place to use nerve agent, if that's the proper term, is in the middle east because it dissipates easily, very difficult in desert terrain for it to last very long, but it's a deadly and potent weapon. and i know the administration is concerned about in their last moments the syrians using this thing as sort of a revenge weapon. jon: yeah. well, sometimes weapons systems, as you know, are constructed for deterrence. is it possible he's just trying to scare some people here, or does he really spend to use these things? >> yeah, i absolutely agree with that. i think he had a bad moment when it looked like the gates were closi
was the beginning of the coup d'État, the soviet union. the cia spy plane was shot down over russia. the cia had suppressed a study showing the soviet antiaircraft missiles can now climb high enough to reach the u2, atlanta ike to believe the pilot would never be captured into a dive on the plane broke up or killed himself with a suicide pill. the russians captured the pilot, powers, khrushchev bloated and credit of the wicked american spies. that was the and. eisenhower was very depressed. i want to resign, he said his faithful assistant, when he came into the oval office after powers was captured and his cover story blown. ike bounced back. he always did, but after nearly eight years of constant attention he was exhausted. ike threatened to use nuclear weapons. he never told anyone whether he actually would use them. he could not, of course or his threat would no longer be credible. talk about the loneliness. ike me all about the burden, from the north african campaign in 1943 to d-day to the conquest of germany, and the liberation of europe. ike smoke four packs a day as a general. he quit co
capital building after the republican-led legislature passed a series of right to work bills. union activists are angry at the new measures which they say weaken unions and limit workers' rights. the governors made it clear he's ready to make it law. that would make michigan, which is considered the birth place of organized labor, the 24th right to work state. >>> for a second straight day, growing outrage in egypt as protesters attacked president mohamed morsi's house. and others demonstrate in tahrir square. a live report on the protests right after this. [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus presents the cold truth. i have a cold... i took dayquil, but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't work on runny noses. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have an antihistamine. really? [ male announcer ] really. alka-seltzer plus cold and cough fights your worst cold symptoms, plus has a fast acting antihistamine to relieve your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus.
it did work. it becomes harder many on many as compared with one-on-one. the u.s. and the soviet union became quite experienced in how to handle mutually assured destruction if you like. or mutual deterrents. when you have a number of -- many nations butting up against each other physically essentially, and with much less experience in handling the issue of deterrents, i think the risks become higher. and if as you suggest proliferation is likely to become more widespread, if iran actually gets nuclear capability, i think the risks are very high. i'm rather pessimistic because it does seem to me that one way or another, a local nuclear war could break out and has a fairly high probability of breaking out. and when it happens, if it happens, the destruction will be very great. i'm a -- rather pessimistic about that. but i see a rather tarnished silver lining and because i think if that happens, then the major powers will step in and actually try to undo proliferation. i'm not sure that would be a very happy world because i think that it would be strong pressures for the big five. the fi
a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the leadership of no nation would ever, ever bargain initiate an action that assured their own destruction? >> well, one thing about the iranian leaders that they have in common with the leaders of terrorist groups like bin laden, they are not strapping on the suicide bombs, they are very willing to see young people and handicapped people and so on strap these things on, but their lives mean a lot to them, and that is something in our hip pocket it seems to me. they want to stay alive and they want to stay in power. >> rose: i want to talk about that. one quick question about what you believe with respect to iran. you believe that an attack by rael will be a terrible thing to happen, because it would only delay the inevi
create jobs but opponents insist it's about busting the unions. we'll get into that. >>> plus the president and the leader of the house of representatives got together over the weekend to talk about the looming fiscal cliff, just three weeks away. after the it was over, this one didn't belly ache about that one and that one didn't belly ache about this one, so what did they do? how did that go? from the journalists at fox news, this is the monday fox report. ...and this, dancing in their heads... ...we have these. home depot gift cards. give the gift of doing, in-store or online. >> shepard: the white house says president obama believes he can cut a deal with house republicans to keep from all going over the fiscal cliff. the president is refusing to compromise on letting tax cuts expire on incomes of more than $250,000 a year. g.o.p. leaders are calling that a job killer and a deal breaker. of course, if we fall off the fiscal cliff, we'll all die, right? actually, taxes will go up for pretty much everybody and automatic spending cuts kick in on knew year's day. the president
the demise of the twinky and labor unions are threatening the big mac, fast food workers and what it means for your lunch. ♪ can't leave the table till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! ♪ ooh baby, can i do for you today? ♪ [ female announcer ] need help keeping your digestive balance? align can help. nly align has bifantis, a patented probiotic that naturally helps maintain your digestive balance. try align to help retain a balanced digestive system. try the #1 gastroenterologist recommended probiotic. align. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. d bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never
cannot be forced to pay union dues. poppy harlow reports from lancing, michigan. >> reporter: michigan is really considered the heart of organized labor here in america. this is the birthplace of the united autoworkers and the future of unions in this state is really in question at this hour. two by the senate, one by the house all focussing on right to work legislation. what does that mean? well, if this state bkdz a right to work state, that means that unions and employers could not mandate that employees join a union or pay any money to that union. that would likely play out meaning less union members, less money for unions, that means less power, and that is at the core of all of this. rick snyder, a big supporter of this right to work legislation saying he will sign it if it makes it to his desk. many union workers vihamently oppose it. >> workers deserve the freedom to choose, and i think this is a good thing. >> this is absolutely not what's right for the worker. right now there are special interests that are trying to pass right to work in many different states, and michigan ri
of marriage act that defines marriage as only the union between a man and woman and california's proposition 8 which banned gay marriage was overturned by an appeals court. cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns has been following both cases for us. joe, explain the impact of today's decision. >> well, it is big impact. as you know, this is one of those cases that people talk about over the water cooler. let's start with proposition 8. very simple, wolf, it is the california ballot initiative passed in 2008 by the people of the state of california that established marriage as between a man and a woman. it overturned a court case that said same sex couples have the right to marry. windsor is the other case you were talking about, it is an attack on defense of marriage act which was passed in 1996 by the congress, signed by the president. it's called windsor against the united states. it is about a woman named edith windsor who had a long time relationship with her partner, and they were married in 2007. spier died in new york in 2009, and edith windsor got a lot of money. something lik
in the union. i daresay virtually every congressional district. like single employer plans, the last -- investments shrank but missed the not. so the contributions necessarily rose at a time when the businesses had less work and less ability to pay them. six years ago a bipartisan coalition in congress with the support of the business and labour community passed the pension protection act. that was an important piece of legislation that recognize that not all multi employer plans or like. some plans are healthier and others. the different plants have different needs. they need flexibility. similar coalition recognizing that multi employer plans as well as in the sun will need a greater from -- funding flexibility. where are we today? after all the events of the past decade, the financial health of these plans varies widely. as you can see from that status kraft, there is a wide range of financial conditions. two years ago, about one-third of all the participants were in plans that reported of a third of 10 million people were in plans that reported they were in green status. today ab
decision could potentially effect every state in the union. more unrest in a critical middle east nation as protesters march on othe palace in egypt and call for the president to resign. thousands of protesters calling for the egyptian leader to get out of office. that president's supporters making new promises of revenge. tonight, the fight outside the presidential palace. and the future of an entire nation in the balance. two radio dj's recently called british hospital and impersonated the queen to ask about kate middleton's pregnancy and for a nurse that answered the phone the shame may have been too much. >> it's with complete sadness that i can confirm the tragic death of a member of our nursing staff. >> tonight the prank call with the deadly fallout. >> plus, escalator fallout at the mall. >> not sure how many people were on the escalator. >> sent holiday shoppers to the hospital. but first from fox this friday nate. the u.s. supreme court is about to jump into the national argument over gay marriage. and the question of whether same sex couples should have the same rights that ev
will be awarded to an unusual recipient this year, the european union. norwegian nobel committee said it made its decision based on the work the eu has done promoting peace since world war ii. it comes as the eu is mired in the wor financist financial crie its founding. >>> the next hour of the cnn "newsroom" begins right now. >>> top of the hour. i'm don lemon. we're going to begin with breaking news on the fiscal cliff talks. president obama, house speaker john boehner met face-to-face at the white house today to try to prevent the fiscal cliff now just 23 days away. we don't have any details on their conversations, but reps for both sides say the lines of communication remain open. meanwhile, at least four republican senators now support a tax hike on wealthy americans. here is senator tom coburn of oklahoma. >> the fact is we're spending money that we don't have on things we don't absolutely need, and there's no grown-ups in washington that will say time-out, stop the politics, let's have a compromise rather than continue to play the game through the press and hurt the country. >> more on thi
a book, a new approach to industrial economics where they have no unions. everybody is responsible for their own work. they do peace work. everybody's responsible. everybody has a lifetime job. they get huge pieces of the pie. and ownership is -- the people, the workers, everybody owns the piece of the pie. host: what does this have to do with the fiscal cliff? caller: well, if more -- if more people -- if more industries would go to that, they wouldn't fall off the cliff. everybody would go to work. host: mr. rosenberg? guest: so i haven't heard of that but it sounds like a great place to be and live. i would have to get the name of that again. host: next up is don on the washington redskins. -- "washington journal." caller: i've been on social security for several years now. it's my understanding that the amount of money that you pay in through the payroll tax affects the amount of social security that you receive and it looks to me like people are under the illusion that this 2% is a good deal but at the same time, why they're going to be shortening themselves when they retire.
the other 22 languages of the european union. it struck me how amazing this. i'm sure millions of iranians are rushing to the west side of the european union to read the guidelines of human rights which clearly are having a great impact on their lives. one of the problems we are confronting -- it is a real problem -- you clearly both alluded to it -- we are confronted with a huge dilemma. we want to stop iran from having nuclear weapons and there is a widespread belief among policy makers that if you pursue a policy of support for democracy promotion inside iran at the same time, the regime will move away from negotiations. if we have to choose between depriving the regime of nuclear weapons or depriving the regime of its power inside the country, it is easier to achieve the former rather than the latter and it's better over all -- that we can live with an authoritarian iran without nuclear weapons and when we try to pursue a free iran, we might end up with an inimical nuclear-arms authoritarian iran. it is an understandable dilemma but it doesn't serve our purposes very well and we have n
. >>> keep it here for "state of the union." it starts in about eight minutes at 9:00 a.m. eastern time. once again, you'll find that interview with treasury secretary tim geithner here on cmn. >>> apple, ocean, blue angel. what's with all these, i guess you could call them unusual baby names, and could they actually impact a child's development? we even reward you for the time you spent there. genius. yeah, genius. you guys must have your own loyalty program, right? well, we have something. show her, tom. huh? you should see november! oh, yeah? giving you more. now that's progressive. call or click today. governor of getting it done. you know how to dance... with a deadline. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. this is awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is, business pro. yes, it is. go national. go like a pro. i have a cold... i took dayquil, but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't work on runny noses. what? [ male annou
when he announced last week he'd sign a bill requiring workers to financially support unions. it could happen tomorrow. moments ago you and your michigan colleagues gave a news conference on this. are you concerned this is going to turn into another messy situation similar to what we saw play out in wisconsin last year? >> here's what i'm concerned about with right to work. is that, number one, it'll end up cutting wages and benefits for middle-income workers who really need the money right now. they're still struggling with under water mortgages, with their kids facing all the student loan debt that i've been fighting to reduce, and also our middle-income families, when they have enough money to take care of themselves, spending that money actually stimulates the economy. so right to work is wrong. everyone who benefits from union representation should at least pay their fair share for that. >> sir, thanks so much. democratic congressman from michigan, hansen clarke. >>> i want to pass long again, watch live coverage of the president's remarks in detroit later today. the president exp
the students to pay higher student loans. >> he decided to fire up the labor union base. about a republican pushbe for right to work laws in the state. >> what we shouldn't do, what we shouldn't doing is trying to take away your right to bargain for better wages at work. >> the employees cheered when the president took aim at the republican governor and legislature. >> we are talking about giving you the right to work for less money. >> the president called if union dispute and the fiscal cliff manufacturered crisis as he sounded a pessimistic tone about the possibility of another recession. >> people will spend nearly $200 billion less than they otherwise would spend. consumer spend willing go down. that means you have to let the customers, businesses get fewer profits. they hire fewer workers and it's a downward spiral. >> some republicans are more hopeful of a deal andialing the party to give the president tax hike hikes in exchange for leverage on entitlement cut. >> the focus shifts to entitlement. maybe it puts us in a place where we can do something that saved the nation. >> other ke
averted for now after mediators got the long shoreman's union to postpone it for month to work out time detail osafter new contract. correspondent phil keeting is following that story from miami. >> at least one end of the year cliff has been averted for now. container cliff. there will be no east and gulf coast port strike happening this weekend. but both sides still have much to work out. if they don't, five weeks from now will be right back to a sweeping strike with great consequences. >> a strike in long beach in los angeles a few weeks ago. that was close. if you cost that area, $1 billion a day. >> sticking point has been the container royalties. salary supplements for long shoremen. heavier the container, the more they get paid. the owners want to cap the royalties at last year's levels to 15,000 long shoreman did not. this from the federal mediator in washington. "the container royalty payment issue has been agreed upon in principle by the parties subject to achieving an overall collective bargaining agreement. this allege saves americans from higher prices for many consumer goo
, the union wouldn't have stayed. fdr is told somehow the japanese-americans are going to be coming in from california to detroit to take over the country. but as thurgood marshall, the supreme court justice, once said, those are precisely the moments when civil liberties matter most and when you have to be careful. and all those presidents suffer in history. eleanor roosevelt said about the incarceration of the japanese-americans, and fdr's failure to bring more jewish refugees into the country before hitler closed the door forever, those were his scars. she knew that. i think lincoln if he came back now would know his scar was that he wished he didn't have to do the habeas corpus. war takes -- it grows on itself and you do everything you need to. it's a sad, dark chapter. >> and the human element, jefferson used this when he talked about buying louisiana, which was unconstitutional, and he was -- >> detail. >> he was for the constitutional amendment before he was against it. he was going to amend the constitution to buy the louisiana purchase. then he got a letter saying napoleon was reth
. it's a real sport. no, its not. 4 million members. 4 million stories. navy federal credit union. >>> gridlock in washington may seem like business as usual today but it hasn't always been that way. throughout the 1960's and '70s during one of the most turn you leapt periods in american history bipartisan senates drove sweeping reform to civil rights and social programs while challenging the executive branch over the vietnam war and ultimately moving to impeach president nixon over the watergate scandal. our next guest ira shapiro is the author of "the last great senate:courage and statesmanship in tames of crisis." welcome to the program. >> nice to be here. >> why do you call it the last great senate? >> well, because from the early 'sick through about 1980 we had a senate that was in the forefront of everything that was going on in the country, and accomplished a great deal. the senate of humphrey, muskee, baker, ted kennedy, many other great americans. and we haven't had a senate like that for the last 30 years. i don't mean it's the last great senate we'll ever have, but we
of an extended ten-hour session. no details have been released, but players union and owners did exchange new proposals. players say they will meet internally today to go over the new offers. the lockout is now in its 83rd day and the sides are still split over how to divide league revenues. >>> kent ullmann is challenging rashard baker the a friendly wager ahead of sunday's showdown between the redskins and the ravens. >> if somehow -- if you somehow sneak a victory, which i can't imagine happening, even though you got lucky this past week against the giants, i will proudly wear an rg3 jersey for an entire day. >> ullmann says the f the ravens win, he wants baker to wear the jersey of haloti ngata at work on friday. baker has accepted the challenge but says he wants to up the ante. he will reveal his new terms for the deal today. that's some pretty strong talk there. saying if they sneak by a win. listen, we've won three in a row against some pretty tough teams and he should be proud to wear rg3's jersey any day. >> we know you are. you've been wearing it every day. time is 4:51. time to get
did not do anything to the cash machine at virginia credit union, except give it a few burn marks. a bomb squad technician checked out the scene to make sure it was safe. the bank stayed open all day. police say there is surveillance video of the incident from about 4:00 this morning. they have not made any arrests at this point. >>> gang violence may be responsible for the murder of a teenager in prince george's county. he was 14 years old and he was shot early this morning in louisdale. pat collins is live at the police headquarters where they're trying to piece together exactly what happened. pat? >> reporter: wendy, a 14-year-old hanging out with gang members ends up dead, shot and killed in a drive-by. the victim, eliez reyes. he goes by the name of cheche. reyes shot and killed this morning. he was 14 years old. police describe it as a gang-related murder. here's why. >> we've determined that the victim was with at least two known gang members early this morning when the murder occurred. >> was the victim involved in the gang? >> at this point we're still working to determin
: president obama facing another key test ahead of his second term over another union battle as a major strike deadline approaches. the next fight concerns our nation's ports. doug mckelway joins us live from washington with details. and, doug, the complaints of the longshoremen whose strike was temporarily averted last week is a symbol what is threatening unions across the u.s., right? >> reporter: it sure is, uma. the longshoremen reached a temporary, 30-day deal last week, last friday which puts off immediate threat of a strike but the long term problems remain. today, for example, it takes one longshoremen to do a job that a generation ago took three men to do. as automation increased longshoremen's union demanded their job security preserved but the industry finds it prohibitively expensive. >> an tick waited rules. we've seen it in the automotive industry, the steel industry, in several productivity machines and they come into play and people get displaced by. that it is a difficult thing. in order to maintain the cost and competitiveness in a global marketplace we have got to pay attent
firsthand what it was like to live under the domination of the soviet union. they understand the significance of this particular proposal and these particular dinds of -- kinds of bills. i would like at this time to recognize the retiring chairman of the rules committee who has done -- soon-to-be retiring chairman of the rules committee who has done so much in his tenure here, i would like to recognize him for 15 seconds, if he goes over that he may have as much time as he wishes to consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for 15 seconds. mr. dreier: i thank my friend for the 15 seconds, and i'll try not to exceed that. if i do i appreciate his generosity in yielding me such time as i might consume. mr. speaker, let me just say that i appreciate the fact that my friend said we should have a defense capability that is second to none. we should be pre-eminent in the world. i appreciate his statement that that needs to be done. i also appreciate the fact that he talks about the multifairous societal needs out there, ensuring we don't see thos
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